Flickr for iOS just got a complete overhaul, bumping the app to version 3.0 and bringing a host of new and welcome features. First thing you’ll notice upon opening the new Flickr is the completely redesigned interface, bringing it to modern design standards on iOS 7. It also just looks plain better than the old version, even though it wasn’t an ugly app before by any means. The app has also improved its suite of editing tools that were previously updated back in August.



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Remember a time when every single software update you made to your computer’s OS or applications required a complete reboot of the system? Computers are still far from perfect, but over at The Restart Page you can relive those annoying and constant operating system restarts of yesteryear, and appreciate how far things have come.

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Sony has nailed down the final launch details for its newest 4K Bravia TVs, and surprise — they just might be affordable this year. The “entry-level” XBR-X850B series will start at a relatively frugal $2,099 for a 49-inch model, with prices peaking…

Source: http://feeds.engadget.com/~r/weblogsinc/engadget/~3/lM4iFKgAWLE/
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Floods didn’t provide nitrogen ‘fix’ for earliest crops in frigid North

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington


Floods didn’t make floodplains fertile during the dawn of human agriculture in the Earth’s far north because the waters were virtually devoid of nitrogen, unlike other areas of the globe scientists have studied.

Instead, the hardy Norsemen and early inhabitants of Russia and Canada have microorganisms called cyanobacteria to mostly thank for abundant grasses that attracted game to hunt and then provided fodder once cattle were domesticated. The process is still underway in the region’s pristine floodplains.

The new findings are surprising because it’s long been assumed that nitrogen crucial to plant growth mainly arrived with floods of river water each spring, according to Thomas DeLuca, a University of Washington professor of environmental and forest sciences and lead author of a paper in the Nov. 6, 2013 issue of the journal PLOS ONE.

Discovering that cyanobacteria in the floodplains were responsible for nitrogen fixation that is taking it from the atmosphere and “fixing” it into a form plants can use partially resolves the scientific debate of how humans harvested grasses there for hundreds of years without fertilizing, DeLuca said. It raises the question of whether farmers today might reduce fertilizer use by taking advantage of cyanobacteria that occur, not just in the floodplains studied, but in soils around the world, he said.



It also might lead to more accurate models of nitrogen in river systems because none of the prominent models consider nitrogen being fixed in floodplains, DeLuca said. Scientists model nitrogen loading of rivers, especially where industrial fertilizers and effluent from wastewater-treatment plants cause dead zones and other problems in the lower reaches and mouths of rivers.

Ten rivers and 71 flood plains were studied in northern Fennoscandia, a region that includes parts of Scandinavia and Finland. The rivers were chosen because their upper reaches are pristine, haven’t been dammed and are not subject to sources of human-caused nitrogen enrichment much like river systems humans encountered there hundreds of years ago, as agriculture emerged in such “boreal” habitats. Boreal habitat found at 60 degrees latitude and north all the way into the Arctic Circle, where it meets tundra habitat is the second largest biome or habitat type on Earth.

In the northern regions of the boreal, the surrounding hillsides have thin, infertile soils and lack shrubs or herbs that can fix nitrogen. In these uplands, feather mosses create a microhabitat for cyanobacteria, which fix a modest amount of nitrogen that mostly stays on site in soils, trees and shrubs. Little of it reaches waterways. On the floodplains, high rates of nitrogen fixation occur in thick slimy black mats of cyanobacteria growing in seasonably submerged sediments and coating the exposed roots and stems of willows and sedges.

“We joke and call the floodplains the ‘mangroves of the North’ because there are almost impenetrable tangles of willow tree roots in places, like a micro version of the tropical and subtropical mangroves that are known to harbor highly active colonies of cyanobacteria,” DeLuca said.



“It turns out there’s a lot of nitrogen fixation going on in both,” he said. For example, the
scientists discovered that in spite of the dark, cold, snowy winters of Northern Sweden, the cyanobacteria there fix nitrogen at rates similar to those living the life in the toasty, sun-warmed Florida Everglades.

The amount of nitrogen provided by the cyanobacteria to unharvested willows and sedges is perhaps a quarter of what U.S. farmers in the Midwest apply in industrial fertilizers to grain crops and as little as a sixth of what they apply to corn.

Human-made fertilizers can be fuel-intensive to produce and use, for example, it takes the energy of about a gallon of diesel to produce 4 pounds of nitrogen fertilizer. In developing countries in particular, nitrogen fertilization rates are spiraling upward, driving up fossil-fuel consumption, DeLuca said. Meanwhile, cyanobacteria naturally occurring in farm soils aren’t fixing nitrogen at all in the presence of all that fertilizer, they just don’t expend the energy when nitrogen is so readily available, he said.

“Although modest in comparison to modern fertilization, the observation that cyanobacteria could drive the productivity of these boreal floodplain systems so effectively for so long makes one question whether cyanobacteria could be used to maintain the productivity of agricultural systems, without large synthetic nitrogen fertilizer inputs,” he said.

###

Co-authors on the paper are Olle Zackrisson and Ingela Bergman with the Institute for Subarctic Landscape Research, Sweden, Beatriz Dez with Pontificia Universidad Catlica, Chile, and Birgitta Bergman with Stockholm University.

Funding for the work came from the European Regional Development Fund and the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation.


For more information:
DeLuca, 206-685-1928, deluca@uw.edu

Suggested websites:


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Floods didn’t provide nitrogen ‘fix’ for earliest crops in frigid North

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington


Floods didn’t make floodplains fertile during the dawn of human agriculture in the Earth’s far north because the waters were virtually devoid of nitrogen, unlike other areas of the globe scientists have studied.

Instead, the hardy Norsemen and early inhabitants of Russia and Canada have microorganisms called cyanobacteria to mostly thank for abundant grasses that attracted game to hunt and then provided fodder once cattle were domesticated. The process is still underway in the region’s pristine floodplains.

The new findings are surprising because it’s long been assumed that nitrogen crucial to plant growth mainly arrived with floods of river water each spring, according to Thomas DeLuca, a University of Washington professor of environmental and forest sciences and lead author of a paper in the Nov. 6, 2013 issue of the journal PLOS ONE.

Discovering that cyanobacteria in the floodplains were responsible for nitrogen fixation that is taking it from the atmosphere and “fixing” it into a form plants can use partially resolves the scientific debate of how humans harvested grasses there for hundreds of years without fertilizing, DeLuca said. It raises the question of whether farmers today might reduce fertilizer use by taking advantage of cyanobacteria that occur, not just in the floodplains studied, but in soils around the world, he said.



It also might lead to more accurate models of nitrogen in river systems because none of the prominent models consider nitrogen being fixed in floodplains, DeLuca said. Scientists model nitrogen loading of rivers, especially where industrial fertilizers and effluent from wastewater-treatment plants cause dead zones and other problems in the lower reaches and mouths of rivers.

Ten rivers and 71 flood plains were studied in northern Fennoscandia, a region that includes parts of Scandinavia and Finland. The rivers were chosen because their upper reaches are pristine, haven’t been dammed and are not subject to sources of human-caused nitrogen enrichment much like river systems humans encountered there hundreds of years ago, as agriculture emerged in such “boreal” habitats. Boreal habitat found at 60 degrees latitude and north all the way into the Arctic Circle, where it meets tundra habitat is the second largest biome or habitat type on Earth.

In the northern regions of the boreal, the surrounding hillsides have thin, infertile soils and lack shrubs or herbs that can fix nitrogen. In these uplands, feather mosses create a microhabitat for cyanobacteria, which fix a modest amount of nitrogen that mostly stays on site in soils, trees and shrubs. Little of it reaches waterways. On the floodplains, high rates of nitrogen fixation occur in thick slimy black mats of cyanobacteria growing in seasonably submerged sediments and coating the exposed roots and stems of willows and sedges.

“We joke and call the floodplains the ‘mangroves of the North’ because there are almost impenetrable tangles of willow tree roots in places, like a micro version of the tropical and subtropical mangroves that are known to harbor highly active colonies of cyanobacteria,” DeLuca said.



“It turns out there’s a lot of nitrogen fixation going on in both,” he said. For example, the
scientists discovered that in spite of the dark, cold, snowy winters of Northern Sweden, the cyanobacteria there fix nitrogen at rates similar to those living the life in the toasty, sun-warmed Florida Everglades.

The amount of nitrogen provided by the cyanobacteria to unharvested willows and sedges is perhaps a quarter of what U.S. farmers in the Midwest apply in industrial fertilizers to grain crops and as little as a sixth of what they apply to corn.

Human-made fertilizers can be fuel-intensive to produce and use, for example, it takes the energy of about a gallon of diesel to produce 4 pounds of nitrogen fertilizer. In developing countries in particular, nitrogen fertilization rates are spiraling upward, driving up fossil-fuel consumption, DeLuca said. Meanwhile, cyanobacteria naturally occurring in farm soils aren’t fixing nitrogen at all in the presence of all that fertilizer, they just don’t expend the energy when nitrogen is so readily available, he said.

“Although modest in comparison to modern fertilization, the observation that cyanobacteria could drive the productivity of these boreal floodplain systems so effectively for so long makes one question whether cyanobacteria could be used to maintain the productivity of agricultural systems, without large synthetic nitrogen fertilizer inputs,” he said.

###

Co-authors on the paper are Olle Zackrisson and Ingela Bergman with the Institute for Subarctic Landscape Research, Sweden, Beatriz Dez with Pontificia Universidad Catlica, Chile, and Birgitta Bergman with Stockholm University.

Funding for the work came from the European Regional Development Fund and the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation.


For more information:
DeLuca, 206-685-1928, deluca@uw.edu

Suggested websites:


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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uow-fdp110113.php
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Calculating the risk: Child sexual assault

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

5-Nov-2013

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Contact: Amy Mattson
amy-mattson@uiowa.edu
319-384-0070
University of Iowa

Affluent girls residing in two-parent homes are much less likely to be sexually assaulted than other female youth, according to a new study from the University of Iowa. The research revealed that when family income reaches 400 percent of the poverty threshold, or around $92,000 for a four-person household, the risk of sexual assault declines by more than half.

The study conducted by UI School of Social Work professor Amy Butler examined sexual assault in more than 1,000 girls aged 17 and younger, across all income levels. It relied on data obtained from the ongoing Panel Study of Income Dynamicsa national survey of families begun in 1968 and directed by University of Michigan faculty.

Unlike other analyses that examine data gathered after a sexual assault has occurred, Butler’s study looked at risk factors related to behavior, family history, and parental income that were measured prior to an assault, giving the work potentially predictive value.

“It’s important to have clear before and after measures,” Butler says.

Published in the International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, the study showed that the risk of sexual assault for girls between the ages of four and 17 declined from 12.3 to 5.6 percent once income reached 400 percent or more of the poverty threshold.

Her analysis also confirmed previous research that showed girls whose mothers had at least a high-school education and whose biological parents were both present from birth to age one had a lower risk of sexual assault.

Nationwide, one in 10 girls is sexually assaulted, according to Butler’s study. This compares to one in five girls who are victims of sexual abusea term often encompassing a broader range of inappropriate behavior that can include voyeurism or verbal pressure for sexas reported by the advocacy organization, the National Center for Victims of Crime.

While reasons behind a decreased risk of sexual assault for young females in economically comfortable, two-parent households are not yet known, Butler notes there may be several possible explanations.

For example, factors that might enable some parents to achieve higher socioeconomic statuse.g. having children later in lifecould be tied to personal characteristics like enhanced maturity levels that are then passed down to their children. Education appears to play a role as well.

“It is possible that educated, two-parent families can better afford to raise their children in safe neighborhoods, send them to safe schools, and ensure that their activities are well supervised, thereby decreasing their risk for sexual assault,” Butler writes.

“Alternatively, the personal characteristics that may enable some parents to achieve higher socio-economic status may be transmitted to the daughter through heredity and parental modeling, thereby reducing her risk.”

Butler’s research helps establish that many risk factors identified in retrospective studies (those conducted after the fact) are accurate predictors of whether a girl will experience childhood sexual assault.

Her analysis found that girls with extremely low math and reading scores, and those referred to special education programs were more likely than their peers to experience an assault. It also confirmed that girls whoaccording to their caregiverswere shy, withdrawn, had impulsive tendencies or expressed feelings of worthlessness were more prone to sexual assault.

The study further outlined that many mental health disorders found in victims and survivors of assault appear to be a result of their experience with rape. Butler is conducting additional analysis to research this link and others. She is hopeful that her study will open the doors for more young women to discuss sexual assault, and encourage them to find support and assistance.

And though her research focuses on risk factors in girls, she is quick to note that victims are never to blame. “Perpetrators hone their skills to entrap girls. No one enters a situation expecting to be sexually assaulted,” says Butler.


###


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Calculating the risk: Child sexual assault

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

5-Nov-2013

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Contact: Amy Mattson
amy-mattson@uiowa.edu
319-384-0070
University of Iowa

Affluent girls residing in two-parent homes are much less likely to be sexually assaulted than other female youth, according to a new study from the University of Iowa. The research revealed that when family income reaches 400 percent of the poverty threshold, or around $92,000 for a four-person household, the risk of sexual assault declines by more than half.

The study conducted by UI School of Social Work professor Amy Butler examined sexual assault in more than 1,000 girls aged 17 and younger, across all income levels. It relied on data obtained from the ongoing Panel Study of Income Dynamicsa national survey of families begun in 1968 and directed by University of Michigan faculty.

Unlike other analyses that examine data gathered after a sexual assault has occurred, Butler’s study looked at risk factors related to behavior, family history, and parental income that were measured prior to an assault, giving the work potentially predictive value.

“It’s important to have clear before and after measures,” Butler says.

Published in the International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, the study showed that the risk of sexual assault for girls between the ages of four and 17 declined from 12.3 to 5.6 percent once income reached 400 percent or more of the poverty threshold.

Her analysis also confirmed previous research that showed girls whose mothers had at least a high-school education and whose biological parents were both present from birth to age one had a lower risk of sexual assault.

Nationwide, one in 10 girls is sexually assaulted, according to Butler’s study. This compares to one in five girls who are victims of sexual abusea term often encompassing a broader range of inappropriate behavior that can include voyeurism or verbal pressure for sexas reported by the advocacy organization, the National Center for Victims of Crime.

While reasons behind a decreased risk of sexual assault for young females in economically comfortable, two-parent households are not yet known, Butler notes there may be several possible explanations.

For example, factors that might enable some parents to achieve higher socioeconomic statuse.g. having children later in lifecould be tied to personal characteristics like enhanced maturity levels that are then passed down to their children. Education appears to play a role as well.

“It is possible that educated, two-parent families can better afford to raise their children in safe neighborhoods, send them to safe schools, and ensure that their activities are well supervised, thereby decreasing their risk for sexual assault,” Butler writes.

“Alternatively, the personal characteristics that may enable some parents to achieve higher socio-economic status may be transmitted to the daughter through heredity and parental modeling, thereby reducing her risk.”

Butler’s research helps establish that many risk factors identified in retrospective studies (those conducted after the fact) are accurate predictors of whether a girl will experience childhood sexual assault.

Her analysis found that girls with extremely low math and reading scores, and those referred to special education programs were more likely than their peers to experience an assault. It also confirmed that girls whoaccording to their caregiverswere shy, withdrawn, had impulsive tendencies or expressed feelings of worthlessness were more prone to sexual assault.

The study further outlined that many mental health disorders found in victims and survivors of assault appear to be a result of their experience with rape. Butler is conducting additional analysis to research this link and others. She is hopeful that her study will open the doors for more young women to discuss sexual assault, and encourage them to find support and assistance.

And though her research focuses on risk factors in girls, she is quick to note that victims are never to blame. “Perpetrators hone their skills to entrap girls. No one enters a situation expecting to be sexually assaulted,” says Butler.


###


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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uoi-ctr110513.php
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Retired UFC legend Chuck Liddell found himself in the audience of some military personal recently. For some reason, the incomprehensible phenomenon of fans wanting fighters to hurt them for photos/videos occurred once more. We’ve seen this before, specifically with Liddell.

There’s a certain type of fan that evidently gets a *ahem* kick out of asking professional fighters to punch them, kick them and choke them. To them, it’s funny, we guess. To us, it would just be downright scary.

At least the latest fan turned punching bag had the quasi legitimate confidence boost of wearing body armor when he asked Liddell to kick him in the torso. It didn’t seem to do the soldier much good when Liddell hit him with a spinning back kick.

Chuck Liddell kick – 1, military body armor – 0. Check out the video above from the UFC’s television host Megan Olivi and see for yourself. Any psychologists out there, feel free to try and explain to Cagewriter the thinking behind asking pro fighters to hit you, uncontested. We’re stumped.

After the jump, our all time favorite fighter hitting fan videos – both featuring Alistair Overeem. Whereas Liddell specializes in obliging drunk fans and idiot radio show hosts, Overeem specializes in kicking little girls and punching female reporters. Really.

Alistair Overeem kicks little girl:


Alistair Overeem gut punches female reporter:

Follow Elias on Twitter @EliasCepeda

Source: http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/mma-cagewriter/video-ufc-chuck-liddell-vs-military-body-armor-170116681–mma.html
Category: alabama football   Jake Locker   ncis   Yahoo Fantasy Football   Nexus 4  

Vice President Joe Biden, center, accompanied by Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., left, speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, right, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Joe Biden, center, accompanied by Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., left, speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, right, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Republican gubernatorial candidate, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, left, smiles along with his wife, Teiro, as she holds a puppy during a rally at Republican headquarters in Richmond, Va., Monday, Nov. 4, 2013. Cuccinelli faces Democrat Terry McAuliffe in Tuesday’s election. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, left, joined by, from second from left, Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., Rep. Gerald Connolly, D-Va., and Vice President Joe Biden, speaks at a campaign event in Annandale, Va. on Monday, Nov. 4, 2013. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Joe Biden, right, is greeted by Rep. Gerald Connolly, D-Va., before speaking as at rally for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, left, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, right, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

(AP) — The acrimonious campaign for Virginia governor neared its end Tuesday, capping a race driven by negative ads, unrelenting accusations of dodgy behavior and a deep rancor between rivals Terry McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli.

McAuliffe, a Democrat, voted before dawn and visited campaign offices to help sustain his lead in the polling. His Republican competitor, meanwhile, scheduled his own campaign visits as he held out hope his conservative supporters would fuel a come-from-behind win.

A third candidate, libertarian Robert Sarvis, also was on the ballot.

Turnout was expected to be low — 40 percent was the figure both sides were using — and both candidates mustered their campaign organizations to find every last supporter. The campaign’s negative tilt turned many voters off, and strategists in both parties predicted the outcome could be decided by just a few thousand votes.

Richard Powell, a 60-year-old retired IT manager who lives in Norfolk, described himself as an independent who frequently votes for members of both parties. He said he cast his ballot for McAuliffe, although not because he’s particularly enthusiastic about him. He said he was more determined not to vote for Cuccinelli, who he said overreaches on a variety of medical issues.

Voters were barraged with a series of commercials that tied Cuccinelli to restricting abortions, and while Powell said the negative advertising “got to be sickening,” abortion rights played a factor in his vote.

“I’m not in favor of abortion — let’s put it that way — but I find that restricting abortion causes far more social harm than allowing abortion, so that was an issue for me,” he said.

The negative advertising aside, both candidates got help from some big names. Both Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton made appearances for McAuliffe in the final weeks. President Barack Obama campaigned for him this weekend, Michelle Obama lent her voice to a radio advertisement and Vice President Joe Biden spoke to supporters on the eve of the election.

Cuccinelli, too, got high-profile backers to the state, including Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal — all potential presidential contenders in 2016.

From the outset, the campaign shaped up as a barometer of voters’ moods and a test of whether a swing-voting state like Virginia could elect a tea party-style governor. As one of just two races for governor nationwide, political strategists eyed the race for clues about what would work for 2014’s midterm elections when control of Congress is up for grabs.

The winner will succeed term-limited Gov. Bob McDonnell, a Republican, for a four-year term starting in January. Obama won the state in 2008 and 2012, but far fewer voters participate in off-year elections and that gives the GOP better odds.

Republicans bet a deeply conservative candidate would be their best shot, passing over a lieutenant governor for Cuccinelli, a crusader against the federal health care law. Democrats chose a loyal partisan who once led the Democratic National Committee and recruited the Clintons to raise millions for him and rally the party faithful.

The 45-year-old Cuccinelli went into Election Day trying to overcome a deficit in the polls, a crush of negative ads and a lingering wariness among fellow Republicans about his conservative views. His day was set to take him from his home in northern Virginia south toward Richmond, where he planned to watch the results with supporters.

Cuccinelli pinned his hopes on voters’ frustrations with the federal health care law he attempted to foil. He tried to make the election into a referendum on the law, which McAuliffe supports.

“I’m scared to death about what Obamacare is doing to Virginians. Terry McAuliffe is scared to death what Obamacare is doing to Terry McAuliffe,” Cuccinelli said Monday, noting its rocky rollout has proved embarrassing for Democrats.

The message was on point with voters like Carl Prendergast, 83, who along with his wife voted a straight Republican ticket.

“We just need less government, more conservative candidates,” he said.

Other Republicans found Cuccinelli too extreme. Thomas Wolfe, 56, said he is a staunch Republican but was turned off by some of Cuccinelli’s positions.

“You don’t believe in climate change and you sue people who are teaching our kids? He’s just too radical for me,” Wolfe said, referring to Cuccinelli’s legal fight with climate scientist Michael Mann.

He also said that while McAuliffe wasn’t his ideal candidate, he voted for the Democrat because he owned a small business and was impressed that he won the endorsement of Virginia Beach’s Republican mayor.

Ahead in the polls, the 56-year-old McAuliffe sought to avoid an eleventh-hour error. On Tuesday morning, McAuliffe stopped by a campaign office to rally volunteers near Richmond. He urged them to knock on one more door and phone one more friend as the campaign near its end. McAuliffe said that effort was needed to combat low turnout.

“This is the greatest democracy in the world. We want everyone to vote,” McAuliffe told reporters.

___

Associated Press writer Brock Vergakis contributed to this report from Norfolk and Virginia Beach, Va.

___

Follow Philip Elliott on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philip_elliott

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-11-05-VA%20Governor/id-fcf69058568e4c68935fde7e25bcaad0
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